A Conversation with Dr. Charles Johnson, MD

Parts 2 and 3 | Interview by
Sandhya Thomas-Montilus, MD
ONSMS President

This month’s interview is Parts 2 and 3 of a 3-part Series recording a conversation I had in February 2017 with one of our long standing and distinguished members, Dr. Charles Johnson, Jr. MD.

During this portion of our conversation, Dr. Johnson shared how he came to be the first black physician at Duke University Hospital.
Duke Hospital sent their instructors over to Lincoln Hospital to conduct rounds with the house staff and Howard had been sending residents to Lincoln Hospital so they could get credits for internal medicine and could take the boards. Dr. Johnson entered that program, and while he was a Fellow there, a visiting group from the National Institute of Health came to conduct an inspection at Duke Hospital.
At this meeting the gentleman representing the National Institute of Health asked Dr. Johnson if he was enjoying his rotation, to which Dr. Johnson responded, “No sir, I am not,” prompting the interviewer to reply, “What’s the problem?”
Dr. Johnson explained to the interviewer that he was not allowed to rotate on the private service. The interviewer promised, “I will take care of that.”

This led to the sequence of events that brought about Dr. Eugene A. Stead’s conversation with Dr. Johnson, culminating in an offer to join the staff at Duke.  Listen to Dr. Johnson as he shares the events that brought him to Duke University Hospital.

Dr. Johnson relates how sharing his dissatisfaction with a representative of the National Institute of Health led to his position at Duke.

LISTEN

Dr. Johnson shares his invitation from Physician-in-Chief, Dr. Eugene A. Stead, to join the staff at Duke Hospital.

LISTEN

Listen to Dr. Johnson’s stipulation for the move to Duke Hospital.

LISTEN

NCMB Licensee Survey Results 2016

In October 2016, NCMB sent emails to 10,000 randomly selected licensees requesting their input on topics impacting the practice of medicine, including physician wellness/burnout, longevity in practice, and issues facing employed physicians versus those in private practice. They also shared the survey with several groups to distribute to their members, including NC Medical Society, NC Osteopathic Medical Association, NC Academy of Physician Assistants, and the Old North State Medical Society.

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Dr. Charles Johnson, Jr. Receives Community Award

DURHAM NC – March 1, 2017 | The Antioch Baptist Church honors ONSMS Member Dr. Charles Johnson, Jr. for his pioneering work as the first black physician on Duke University’s medical faculty. Dr. Johnson was one of six influential community members recognized this year in the annual award of community members giving selflessly to residents of the Durham area. (Dr. Johnson is pictured on the far right in the photograph.)

Read the full article at The DurhamVOICE.

A Conversation with Dr. Charles Johnson, MD

Interview by
Sandhya Thomas-Montilus, MD
ONSMS President

In celebration of BLACK HISTORY MONTH I’d like to share with everyone the first installment of a 3-part Series of a conversation I had the privilege of enjoying earlier this month with one of our long standing and distinguished members, Dr. Charles Johnson, MD.

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Black History Month 2017

“Hundreds of thousands descended on Washington, D.C.’s, Lincoln Memorial Aug. 28, 1963. It was from the steps of the memorial that King delivered his famous I Have a Dream speech. King’s many speeches and nonviolent actions were instrumental in shaping the nation’s outlook on equality.” —from Open Vault from WGBH

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Mentorship of Black Boys

Mentorship of black boys: A goal of the Old North State Medical Society. Amazing programs in effect!

MEANINGFUL MENTORSHIP

Every year, almost as many black males are killed in Oakland, California, as graduate high school ready for college. But the country’s first public school program developed specifically for African American males is changing that equation.

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Vitamin B12 Deficiency

“B12 deficiency is the most misunderstood ignored and costly epidemic costing billions of healthcare dollars. It causes debilitating health, anemia, intellectual disabilities in children, mental illness, cognitive decline, fall-related trauma, and it can cause premature death”.  Sally Pacholok RN.

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